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Death with a double Edge is book 4 in the historical murder mystery series by Anne Perry, published by Ballantine Books. If features junior barrister Daniel Pitt who is assigned to secretly investigate the mysterious murder of top financial barrister Jonah Drake to keep the law firm above suspicion in case his last activity was not exactly above board. Danile’s father, Head of Special Branch Thomas Pitt, offers valuable advice while his trusted friend and colleague Toby Kitteridge works on the legal issues. Together they reveal ties to the murder of a woman with connections to a number of wealthy men and find links to politics and dangerous illegal activity. As the case moves forward, more people are found dead in the same area of London. –Even to Daniel’s own family get too close to danger.

Main character, junior barrister Daniel Pitt is well connected with a middleclass upbringing. He seems quite empathic and broad minded for a man of his time, particularly his view of women is quite impressive. It’s easy to name him my favorite of this story.
Supporting character is colleague and friend Toby Kitteridge who has worked in the law firm for 8 years. He seems a methodical, trustworthy and kind man who seems to devote all his time to the job.

The setting of this story is late spring/early summer of 1911in London. Other books I have read of Anne Perry has been set in autumn/winter with plenty of darkness, rain and foggy cold weather where the characters are in need of huddling in front of fireplaces with cups of tea to warm themselves and dry up. This one stands out with its spring vibe and descriptions of light, sun and flowers. I also loved the historical context of London 1911. Technical inventions like motor driven vehicles have replaced hansom cabs and horse drawn carriages. The writing is beautiful and I particularly loved the description of feelings and closeness between Daniel and his parents which are my favorite part s of the story. When Daniel uses his parents as sounding boards, it clarifies the drama and adds an enjoyable sense of danger and gloom to the story. The dialogue is super clear and helps readers follow every step of the way as the plot is meticulously ironed out.

Readers who enjoy historical murder mystery would enjoy this one and might wish to follow the new series. Fans of Anne Perry would love this addition to her extensive work. Thank you to Ballantine Books, author Anne Perry and my local library for the opportunity to share my honest review. All opinions are completely my own.

Conclusion: Death with a double Edge is the fascinating story where junior barrister Daniel Pitt investigates the murder of his senior colleague who has gotten too close to a case with ties to politics and a luxury prostitute with connections to a number of wealthy men. Daniel’s own family ends up in danger.

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Beauty among Ruins is the standalone novel by J'nell Ciesielski, published by Thomas Nelson. The year is 1915 and we follow socialite Lily Durham when she is sent to England as punishment for having played too many tricks on her parents. They hope she will find an eligible husband, but Lily takes position as nurse’s aid at Kinclavoch Castle convalescent home for WWI soldiers in Scotland. The matron thinks her an air-head unable to do any kind of real work and challenges her with the worst assignments. But Lily is adamant to help and proves to have excellent bedside manner and a knack for keeping the patient’s spirits up. The Laird, Alec MacGregor is weighed down by financial problems, but Lily’s zest for life manages to get him out of his dark place and improve his courage.
Someone seems to be working to ruin the estate. What seems like accidents happen and a patient goes missing. Lily and Alec grow closer as they work to figure out who is responsible.

Main character is socialite Lily Durham who outward has a zest for life but inward suffers raging insecurities. I feel for her as she has heard all her life that her only purpose in life is to make a good marriage. In this story her character goes through an impressive development and she starts to see a new purpose.

Supporting character is Alec MacGregor, Lord Strathem of Kinclavoch whose character starts out as a brooding recluse. He worries about his estate and his constant leg pain. His character goes through a personal development as he has a shift in his emotions and view of life.

I felt this plot stood out with its interesting setting in Scotland and the placing of the entitled main character in an environment where she has to overcome more challenges than merely finding a husband. Taking place in a castle gave it a vibe reminiscent to Downton Abby; only more run down due to financial troubles. The brooding recluse of a Laird also made me think of the initial part of Beauty and The Beast. The combination of the interesting mystery part and the slow burn romance, including vivid descriptions of the scenery around the Castle, transferred me to the Scottish Highlands, where I hope to go some day. Very hard to decide if my favorite part was the mystery or the slow burn romance. Both were captivating and excellently written . I loved the funny dialogue between Lily and Alec and found it fascinating to follow the development of their relationship as they ruffled each other’s feathers and challenged each other’s vulnerabilities. I think they both were favorite characters. The surprising and amusing part where Lily’s parents showed up I thoroughly enjoyed.

Anyone who enjoys WWI historical romances with a bit of a unique twist will enjoy this one. Similar authors to explore might be Abigail Wilson or Michelle Griep. Thank you to Thomas Nelson and NetGalley for this opportunity to share my honest review. All opinions are completely my own.

Conclusion: Beauty among Ruins is the captivating, unique historical romance set in a Scottish castle converted to WWI soldier’s convalescent home where an American socialite finds romance while mysterious things happen.

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The Prince of Spies is book 3 in the Hope and Glory series by Elizabeth Camden, published by Bethany House Publishers. The story is set in 1902 Washington DC, and we follow ex-government spy, now magazine journalist, Luke Delacroix, as he works to improve food legislation. He meets governmental photographer Marianne Magruder and instantly falls for her, but when they learn each other’s family names they realize they have landed in the middle of their families’ long lasting feud, and it seems impossible to have a future together. Luke takes part in a test of canned foods, while Marianne’s photography skills prove important in the work for food safety.

Main character Luke Delacroix is a magazine journalist who worked secretly as a government spy. He seems the character who develops the most through the 3 books, from an entitled thrill-seeker in need of his brother’s rescuing in the first book to a more mature adult who still has a lot of self doubt. He spends more time contemplating the value of his work and his future, which makes him very relatable.

Supporting character, governmental photographer Marianne Magruder is very grateful to her powerful father for having given her a privileged life in want for nothing and acts like I would expect for a woman of her time. I love that she goes through a personal development. This makes her my favorite of this story.

The Prince of Spies reads well as a standalone. Hints to previous books are given, but it would make the experience even richer to have read the two previous installments. Apart from following Luke’s journey to find love, this fascinating plot focuses on his use of contacts to improve the food and drug industry. My favorite part of the story was the little mystery element about Marianne’s estranged aunt.

While in Cuban prison, Luke had plenty of time for Bible reading and he seems to have established a strong faith. Marianne seemed to have a spiritual awakening towards the end of the story.

Elizabeth Camden has been one of my go-to authors for years. I love her writing style and choose to read one of her books every year. Anyone who likes romance plots combined with technical inventions will enjoy this. Fans of Elizabeth Camden will love this story. Similar authors to explore might be Roseanna M. White or Jody Hedlund.

Thank you to Bethany House Publishers, Elizabeth Camden and NetGalley for this opportunity to share my honest review. All opinions are completely my own.

Conclusion: in this fascinating story ex-government spy, now magazine journalist, Luke Delacroix is working to improve food safety laws while struggling to be with the woman he loves. Her father owns the company which produces unsafe canned foods and is the one Luke is fighting against.

Rating: 5 stars / 5

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Georgana’s Secret is the standalone regency romance debut by Arlem Hawks, published by Shadow Mountain Publishing. Napoleonic Wars are raging and Navy captain’s daughter Georgana Woodall has been removed from her abusive grandmother’s care and is in disguise as a cabin boy on Her Majesty’s Navy vessel Deborah headed for Antigua. First Lieutenant Dominic Peyton takes cabin boy George under his wing. Through the dangerous French attacks on the vessel, they become close. Dominic suspects something is up with the little cabin boy and there seems something strange about his family background.

Main character Navy Captain’s daughter is Georgana Woodall. I feel desperately sorry for her having been exposed to her grandmother’s violence most of her life and is bullied by the other ship mates. But throughout the story she finds impressive strength and compassion within herself and she is my favorite of this story.

Supporting character First Lieutenant Dominic Peyton seems a light hearted and happy person in total control of who he is and what his future holds. He seems to have slightly liberal views on propriety which impresses me. Events on the convoy mission challenge his view of life.
This story reminds me of a movie favorite of mine, Master and Commander, which has similar setting aboard a British Navy vessel during Napoleonic Wars. I can’t remember having read any plot which deal with the combination of romance and nautical warfare quite like this. I know we are only at the beginning, but this unique story just might turn out to be one of my favorites this year.
The beautiful writing intrigued and enthralled me. Descriptions were so vivid I felt transferred to the ship. It was hard to take a break to get some sleep. I just had to find what would happen next with Georgana and Dominic. I loved that there even was light hearted, amusing dialogue in places. It’s been a long time since a character has engaged me like Georgana. She seemed a well developed character with the perfect blend of human and believable. So relatable she could have lived next door.

A little surprise gem was included as Georgana and Dominic enjoyed a little escape to a faraway beach in Antigua where they got to be alone together (Georgana being George). This part I felt was particularly well written and was my absolute favorite of the story.

I am really excited to see what Arlem Hawks comes up with next and
anyone who enjoys a great regency romance set at sea will love this.
Similar authors to explore might be Sarah E. Ladd or Ronda Gibb Hinrichson. Thank you to Shadow Mountain Publishing, Arlem Hawks and NetGalley for this opportunity to share my honest review. All opinions are completely my own.

Conclusion: This beautifully written, thoroughly engaging regency about Georgana who hides as a sailor trying to stay away from her violent grandmother, when she meets a man whose only love is the sea.
Rating: 5 stars / 5

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When Cordelia Owens’ sweetheart Phineas enlists to fight against the Yankees, she tries to keep up hope by writing heroic stories. Phineas gets wounded in a raid on his vessel and struggles for months to make it home to Delia. They both have to get real on the issue of keeping slaves as well as deal with the future of their relationship.

Dreams of Savannah is the standalone novel written by Roseanna M. White, published by Bethany House Publishers. Setting of the plot is Savannah, Georgia 1861 and we get to follow Cordelia Owens as her sweetheart Phineas Dunn has gone off to serve in the Confederate navy. He gets shot, swept aboard and lost, but in spite of bad news, Cordelia writes heroic, hopeful stories and does not accept he is dead. Seriously wounded, Phineas gets washed ashore in Cuba where free black, British Vicar Luther Bromley, agrees to nurse him back to health in return for Phineas’ help finding his illegally sold wife. As war rages ever closer to Savannah, increasing numbers of slaves run away to join the Yankees and be declared free. Cordelia and Phineas have to get real on the issue of keeping slaves as well as deal with the future of their relationship.

Main character is Cordelia, Delia, Owens, enjoys a super privileged lifestyle. She has an impressive imagination she uses to raise funds for Confederacy and keep up hope in others. Her character shows a healthy set of values as the plot progresses.

British Vicar, Luther Bromley, is my favorite character of this story. He finds himself in a very challenging position as a free black in an area where people like him are slaves. Description of the relationship developing between Phineas and Luther were my favorite part of the plot.

As a European, this is a very interesting plot from a new to me author. I loved the amusing and lighthearted writing and dialogue. I particularly found the written Gullah-English of the slaves very entertaining and felt this added uniqueness to the plot. I loved how the Lucas Bromley character taught me more about the difference between a free black and a slave.
Delia’s cousin Julius contributed drama to the plot as he was a threat to both Delia and her lady’s maid slave Salina, while trying to present himself as a worthy suitor for Delia. He made my skin crawl every time he was present in the plot. For this, I found his character both excellent and believable if not exactly likable.

Anyone who enjoys who enjoys historical romance, specifically set in the Civil War would enjoy this one. Fans of Roseanna M. White would definitely love it, I think. Similar author to explore might be Tamara Alexander.
Thank you to #Bethany House Publishers, @roseannamwhite and #NetGalley for this opportunity to share my honest review. All opinions are completely my own.

Conclusion: Dreams of Savannah is the captivating novel by Roseanna M. White about Delia and Phin’s privileged life as war breaks out. He enlists, everything changes and she tries to keep up hope by writing heroic stories. They both have to get real on the issue slavery and deal with the future of their relationship.

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The Vanishing at Loxby Manor is the standalone by Abigail Wilson, published by Thomas Nelson. The story is set in Kent, England 1816, and is about gentlewoman Charity Halliwell who has returned from Ceylon to stay as the Cavanagh family’s guest. She finds them terribly distraught because their daughter has misbehaved and disappeared and keeps seeing lights from the nearby Abbey. Locals are scared and keep away from it while some mysterious activity seems to be going on. She gets help from her close friend and heir to the Manor, Piers Cavanagh, to investigate what has happened to his sister and if the disappearance is part of a lager mystery.

Main character is gentlewoman Charity Halliwell seems a vulnerable woman who has suffered a blow to her selfworth she tries to keep secret. She is relatable and I feel for her, but she also frustrates me as she keeps things hidden and gets in her own way. She seems a well developed character who is easy to like and is my favorite of this story.

Supporting character is heir to the Manor Piers Cavanagh who is a botanist. Having been ostracized from Society following rumors of cowardice, he seems a really good person. Circumstances have not been on his side and he has suffered the harsh, unfair judgment of The Ton.

Main dramatic element of this story is the mysterious disappearance which makes Charity and Piers investigate local matters left alone for years. Rigging of horse races is an interesting element I have not read about before.
The writing has a deliciously dark and mysterious vibe which I love to read this time of year. Charity lands in kind of an investigator role. A“Miss Marple Light” if you will.
Charity and Piers have strong feelings from five years ago before Charity went to Ceylon. I enjoyed the process as complications in their relationship get a chance to be straightened out and feelings rekindled. This is my favorite part of the story.
The faith element is weaved into the last part of the plot as Charity and Piers have to trust God to help them with their struggles.

The ending to this story deserves a few sentences of its own as it was surprising beyond belief. I had my eye on several of the characters, but never the actual culprit. I really loved that.

This is the second book I have read by Abigail Wilson and I have loved them both. She is firmly on my radar now and I am eagerly awaiting what she comes up with next. Readers of Historical romance and Historical mystery I’m sure will enjoy The Vanishing at Loxby Manor. Fans of Abigail Wilson will definitely love it.
Similar authors to explore might be Sarah E. Ladd or Michelle Griep.
Thank you to Thomas Nelson and NetGalley for this opportunity to share my honest review. I received a complimentary copy of this book. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.

Conclusion: The Vanishing at Loxby Manor is the intriguingly mysterious historical which includes disappearance, murder and the rekindling of lost love. All tied together in an enjoyably unexpected ending.

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When crime photographer and news reporter Sarah Bain gets married to
Detective Sergeant Thomas Barrett, the ceremony gets interrupted by a murder. The victim is a photographer specializing in taking scam photos of ghosts. Sarah investigates the technology and tricks used to con grieving people.

A Portrait of Peril is book 5 in the Victorian Mystery series by Laura Joh Rowland, published by Crooked Lane Books. The setting is London 1890 and we follow newspaper photographer Sarah Bain, her police husband and her news photography/reporter team as they investigate how some members of the spiritualist community use a combination of new technology and tricks to con grieving people. Sarah and Thomas’ wedding ceremony is interrupted when
a scam photographer is found murdered in the church crypt. Later his publisher is found dead too. A member of Sarah’s team is standing over the body with blood on his hands and he ends up in jail charged with the murder. Besides investigating the two murders, Sarah secretly looks into the murder case relating to her own family.

Main character is crime photographer and reporter Sarah Bain. She is very self sufficient and has a hard time controlling her temper and struggles with the relationship with her late mother. She seems a complex and believable character who is my favorite of this story.

Supporting character is detective Sergeant Thomas Barrett. He seems a bit bland to me, and I struggle to connect with him. But I picked up on his deepest respect/fear for his mother. I wonder what that might mean for his relationship with fiercely independent Sarah.

I enjoyed how this story starts where similar reads have ended- with marriage. I found it strange and surprising that Sarah and Thomas didn’t find it terribly disturbing to have their wedding ceremony interrupted by a murder. They seemed to go on with things like on a normal day.

The plot contained details of previous stories which made it function as a standalone, but I would have preferred to read the series from the beginning to get to know the characters and follow their development through the series. As I jumped in at book 5, I felt I had missed out on this.
My favorite part of the story was descriptions of the living arrangements with Sarah’s group of unlikely friends and co-workers. The least favorite part was descriptions of an autopsy procedure.

Anyone who loves historical crime fiction will enjoy this. As will fans of Laura Joh Rowland. Similar authors to explore might be Anna Lee Huber or Erin Lindsey.
Thank you to Crooked Lane Books and NetGalley for this opportunity to share my honest review. All opinions are completely my own.

Conclusion: A Portrait of Peril is the interesting and entertaining story about a wedding ceremony interrupted by the murder of a photographer specializing in ghost photos to con grieving relatives.

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Rookie constable Jackson Forge’s first assignment is to find a missing cabby. To do that, he needs thief ringleader Kit Turner’s local knowledge and connections. In this unlikely alliance both have to trust each other with their lives as they unravel criminal activity with ties to City public office.
The Thief of Blackfriars Lane is the standalone novel written by Michelle Griep, published by Barbour Fiction. The plot is set in London 1885, and we follow fresh-out-of-training Constable Jackson Forge who is assigned to find the missing cab driver who is thief ringleader Kit Turner’s foster dad. With her extensive local knowledge and connections, Jackson gets to experience an underworld of dangerous cutthroats and cheats while orphan Kit has to learn to trust again. They deal with life threatening situations connected to criminal activity with ties to City public office.

Main character is rookie Constable Jackson Forge who seems to be a well rounded character from a relatively secure family background. He seems the voice of reason in this story and tries to keep Kit away from the worst of the life threatening madness she gets into.

Supporting character is thief ringleader and orphan Kit Turner who is a feisty, brave and very resourceful young woman hiding her loneliness and vulnerability. She is complex and struggles to trust, which makes her realistic and appealing character my favorite.

I loved how this plot was action packed and drew me into underworld London of 1800s. The stunning descriptions, particularly of the London underground (before tubes), made me feel a part the plot. I felt the characters were relatable and I enjoyed how Jackson and Kit kept meeting cynical, dangerous characters scheming to make big money and get one over on competition.
The excellent research built an exciting plot offering all my favorite elements of a story. One part mystery and one part romance all tied together in a historical setting. With the Dickensian feel, the amusing writing and dialogue made it one of the most entertaining reads in a very long time.
My favorite part was description of how the relationship between Jackson and Kit developed from the initial friendship to budding romance, as they faced mortal danger together. The descriptions of the extreme poverty, fear and despair of a woman who tries to support her children while suffering illness, was not my favorite. But I appreciate the dramatic effect. Michelle Griep is fast becoming one of my go-to-authors in historical romance, because I enjoy her action packed plots so much. I’ll be eagle-eying booksellers for her next release.
Anyone who enjoys action packed historical romance with a Dickensian twist would love this. As will fans of Michelle Griep’s other work. Similar authors to explore might be Abigail Wilson or Sarah E. Ladd. Thank you to Barbour Fiction and NetGalley for this opportunity to share my honest review. All opinions are completely my own.

Conclusion: The Thief of Blackfriars Lane is the packed and exiting story about rookie Constable Jackson Forge and thief ringleader Kit Turner who team up to find her foster dad. They get in life threatening situations while unraveling criminal activity with ties to City public office.

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When Baronet’s daughter and amateur sleuth Rosalind Thorne is asked to investigate what appears to be a suicide, she finds nothing is as it seems. Among the upper crust of society she discovers motives for bad deeds fueled by financial greed and social ambition.

A Lady Compromised is book 4 in Rosalind Thorne Mysteries by Darcie Wild, published by Kensington Books. This is the very entertaining and intriguing story about amateur sleuth Rosalind Thorne as she is invited to help solve a mysterious case. The authorities have decided it was suicide, but the victim’s sister thinks he was shot as he was getting ready to duel. Rosalind’s investigation reveals a string of hidden secrets and cover-ups among upper class families. They consider themselves beyond reproach, which the investigation totally contradicts.

Main character is Baronet’s daughter and amateur sleuth Rosalind Thorne. Her family has fallen on hard times following her father’s forger activity. She tries to hide this while assisting friends in need using her investigation skills and connections. She travels to opulent English country estates not unlike Agatha Christie’s Poirot.

Dowager Lady Casselmaine is a well developed and interesting supporting character who seems to have chosen a reclusive life. Her character goes through a development process from rather standoffish into a more amiable person who tries to open herself up to the world and live a better life. For this reason she is my favorite of this story.

The fly-on-the-wall perspective of the upper class lifestyle I found thoroughly amusing. I can’t remember having read anything with similar detailed descriptions of how dinner parties might feel for guests. The characters came alive and felt both relatable and realistic in this setting. My favorite part was descriptions of the Dowager Countess’ journey and development through the story. I also loved following Rosalind’s somewhat complicated and interesting past with her host.

I didn’t know much beforehand about duels, which played an important role in the plot. I very much enjoyed the descriptions of the secrecy surrounding it. Bad attitudes against foreigners and a notion that some people have “superior genes” made the plot stand out, and added drama. I found this a unique, surprising element I have not read about before.

I read this as a standalone, which worked perfectly. The ending left me curious and opens up for the next book. While this is the first cozy mystery I have read by Darcie Wilde, I would very much like to start from the beginning and read the whole series.

Anyone who enjoys the affluent country environments reminiscent of Agatha Christie and Jane Austin would love this. Fans familiar with Darcie Wilde’s works would too.
Similar authors to explore might be Andrea Penrose and Rosemary Simpson.

Thank you to Kensington Books and NetGalley for this opportunity to share my honest review. All opinions are completely my own.

Conclusion: A Lady Compromised is the entertaining and intriguing new installment in Rosalind Thorne Mysteries series. Amateur sleuth Rosalind Thorne solves crimes in Jane Austin-like opulent English country environments. Somebody ends up dead in what appears to be a duel gone horribly wrong. Bad attitude against foreigners was a unique and surprising element adding drama to the story.

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On a stormy night Physician’s daughter Laura Callaway is alerted that there’s a shipwreck on the local shore with only one survivor. Alexander Lucas hides his secrets well, but danger seems to follow him to Cornwall.

A Castaway in Cornwall is written by Julie Klassen, published by Bethany House Publishers. The story is set in North Cornwall 1813 and we follow Laura Callaway as she works on her admirable project to salvage trinkets from wrecks and inform next of kin of their loved ones lost at sea. When another ship wrecks, a man is washed ashore and ends up in Laura’s care to be nursed back to life. He presents himself as Alexander Lucas, has a foreign accent and reveals very little about who he is and where he is from.
While this is the second book I have read recently with similar setting, this plot stands out in the way it describes people’s struggles to survive in rather modest circumstances. With a backdrop of the Napoleonic War, the story deals with the need to belong to a family and a community. As an orphan, Laura struggles with both.

Main character physician’s daughter Laura Callaway lost her parents and lives with non-blood relatives. For a woman who struggles so much, I quite admire how she is able to make such a difference in other people’s lives and that’s why she is my favorite of this story.

Supporting character naval sea Captain Alexander Lucas struggles with consequences of war, and goes through a process of learning how to trust again. I felt he seemed human and likable as we got to follow his thoughts and perspectives. Danger seemed to follow him ashore in Cornwall.

I loved the vivid descriptions of daily life and occasional celebrations at the Cornish coast. I could easily see how story could easily be adapted to a movie reminiscent of Poldark. I found the characters relatable and many of them sympathetic. A few really unlikable ones wired me up and added great drama. The mystery element was my favorite part, which related to Alexander Lucas previous life and family background gradually told via his perspective of the story.

The romance part of the story seemed to be on the backburner until the last part of the plot. As danger was at the forefront, that made perfect sense to me. I enjoyed the dramatic parts of the story and the slightly surprising elements at the end. I felt it was all expertly tied up into a satisfying conclusion to this standalone novel.

Anyone who enjoys a historical romance set in Cornwall will love this story. As will fans of Julie Klassen. Similar authors to explore while eagerly awaiting next release from Julie Klassen
might be Kristi Ann Hunter or Jody Hedlund Thank you to Bethany House Publishers and NetGalley for this eARC which gave me the opportunity to share my honest review. All opinions are completely my own.

Conclusion: A Castaway in Cornwall is the entertaining and enjoyable story about a woman who struggles to belong and a man marked by war who both long for a place to call home.
Rating: 4 stars / 5
Main reasons: great plot and mystery element, relatable characters, signature writing.

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When priceless diamonds are stolen socialite Prudence MacKenzie and colleague ex-Pinkerton investigator Geoffrey Hunter takes on the case. A series of mysterious deaths take place, which seem connected to the diamond theft.

Death, Diamonds and Deception is book 5 in A Gilded Age Mystery series by Rosemary Simpson, published by Kensington Publishing Corporation. The story is set in New York 1889 as famous and priceless diamonds are stolen and heiress Prudence MacKenzie and her colleague ex-Pinkerton investigator Geoffrey Hunter investigate the case.

Main character is late judge’s daughter Prudence MacKenzie. She is fiercely independent and not interested in the limitations of marriage. I enjoyed that, and hope such a woman existed in the Gilded Age.

Supporting character ex-Pinkerton investigator, Geoffrey Hunter has the nice guy role. I find it amusing how he pretends not to be romantically interested in Prudence. There is a sweet element of romance between Prudence and Geoffrey in the more quiet parts of the story, which adds interest to the story and what the ending might be.

This plot felt reminiscent of others I have read set in gilded age New York, but it stood out as it offered fascinating extra insight into the lives of the richest of Gilded Age New York. Historical facts were weaved into the expertly written story. It felt like I was a fly on the wall while learning more about diamonds. The story had an amusing, light vibe. I particularly enjoyed the parts describing the relationship between Prudence and her larger-than-life Aunt Gillian. Her character added a slightly surprising and unique element to the story as she did more than chaperone Prudence. Her title, wealth and formidable presence offered Prudence admission to establishments women would normally be unwelcome. Aunt Gillian was my favorite character and I thoroughly enjoyed when she interfered with Prudence’s questioning methods and generally meddled in her attempt at creating a professional life.

The characters felt real and relatable, particularly the hansom cab driver Danny Dennis who had insight into living conditions around Five Points. Descriptions of how life might have been in this part of the city were my least favorite of this story, but added an excellent dramatic effect.

I loved how loose ends were expertly tied together into a dramatic ending fit for a movie. This is the first I have read in this series and it worked perfectly as a standalone. The main characters and the hints to previous plots made me want to start from the beginning of the series and read up on the whole thing.
Anyone who enjoys stories set in Gilded Age and historical fiction is sure to love this one. As will fans of Rosemary Simpson. Similar authors to explore might be Kate Belli or Alyssa Maxwell.

Thank you to Kensington Publishing Corporation and NetGalley for this eARC which gave me the opportunity to share my honest review. All opinions expressed are completely my own.

Conclusion: This is the entertaining story about a diamond theft in Gilded Age New York and a series of murders which seems to connect to it, and secrecy and cover ups within a prominent banker family are revealed. The perfect companion for an afternoon in front of the fire.
Rating: 5 stars / 5
Main reasons: well crafted plot, great writing and relatable characters, fabulous ending

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"Heaven and Nature Sing" by Carolyn Miller
The story is set in Wycombe, England, December 1813 and begins when gentleman’s daughter Edith Mansfield joins a Christmas gathering where she is shocked to meet estate owner George Bannerman. Edith rejected George’s proposal a year ago and neither of them has recovered. I enjoyed how the plot centers on the entertaining process when they try to get room to deal with their feelings while also take part in the Christmas cheer. My favorite part was the Christmas vibe I got from descriptions of activities reminiscent of modern day Christmas workshops and a walk in the estate woods to fetch greenery for decorations. The Christmas songs also naturally added to the Christmas cheer. Carolyn Miller writes beautifully and I loved the lighthearted and bantery dialogue between Edith and George. Edith frustrated me as I felt she lacked back bone, while George was the “nice guy” character who tried to win Edith back. The good natured, energetic and slightly meddling godmother, who hosted the gathering was my favorite character. A familiar character from The Elusive Miss Ellison (Regency Brides: A Legacy of Grace Book 1) was a welcome reminder, as I read the book some time ago.

"Far as the Curse Is Found" by Amanda Barratt
The story is set in London, 1816 when war veteran Dwight Inglewood, Earl of Amberly happens upon seriously ill barmaid Jenny Grey on her way to give her baby up. He decides to offer her work at his estate. The setting of the plot seems slightly less affluent and different from others I have read and I felt it had a Dickensian vibe in the beginning as Jenny was in desperate circumstances. Later it goes on to feel reminiscent of beauty and the beast. Dwight isolates himself and neglects the estate, while Jenny prays to God for guidance how to help him. I loved how Jenny and Dwight tried to be positive forces in each other’s lives without asking for anything in return and that their feelings for each other grew from a base of friendship. I particularly enjoyed the parts describing how Jenny introduced Dwight to reading the Bible, which had a positive effect on his mental health. His attitude towards life seemed to shift and he grew conscious of people around him, including Jenny and her baby.

"The Wonders of His Love" by Erica Vetsch
The story is set in Oxfordshire, 1814 when Lady Pricilla, Cilla, Haverly meets portrait painter Scottish artist Hamish Sincclair, who has come to paint Cilla’s brother and sister-in-law as a Christmas present. This plot feels unusual as it deals with a privileged female character who is set to become a duchess when her husband dies and she becomes more of a servant to the dowager duchess. I loved that she wants to change her life, feeling uncomfortable in her present role in the family. The characters of this story were very entertaining and felt likable and realistic, save for a couple of seriously unpleasant ones. I loved that Cilla seemed to have a loving and close relationship with her brother and sister-in-law made clear to all on Christmas. That a relationship could develop between Cilla and Hamish as they were of such different classes felt an enjoyable and slightly surprising element. The story mentioned familiar characters from the Serendipity & Secret series, interesting for new readers.

Recommendations: Anyone who enjoys light hearted historical Christmas read will love this. As will fans of Carolyn Miller, Amanda Barratt and Erica Vetsch. All opinions in this review are completely my own. Similar authors to explore might be Kristi Ann Hunter or Leah Garriott.

Conclusion: Three entertaining stories about Christmas activities and celebrations beginning of the 1800s. While settings differ in grandeur, all enjoy similar celebrations and singing of Christmas carols. The writing is beautiful and the characters relatable. It adds up to very nice entertainment in front of the fire with a cup of tea.

Rating: 4 stars / 5
Main reasons: beautiful writing, entertaining characters

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When Poirot is summoned to Kingfisher Hill to solve a murder, he has to promise to keep the assignment secret. While investigating, he realizes he is dealing with two complex murders and plenty of distractions.

The Killings at Kingfisher Hill is the New Hercule Poirot Mystery by Sophie Hannah, published by William Morrow. The story is set in fictional Kingfisher Hill country estate in Surrey 1922. We follow Hercule Poirot and new colleague Scotland Yard Inspector Edward Catchpool as they are summoned to Kingfisher Hill to solve the murder of Frank Devonport. They travel by luxury motor coach where a seemingly disturbed woman is adamant she will be killed if she sits in a certain seat. Poirot agrees to switch seats and takes her place next to another woman who confesses to a murder. Nothing happens to him and Poirot is both shocked and curious to see if these two occurrences on the coach are linked to the murder he is assigned to solve.

Main character Hercule Poirot seems his recognizable self. I enjoy how new details makes him even more interesting while the most important original traits are still in place; maybe with some new twists. I find it charming that he uses more French language.

Second main character and narrator is Scotland Yard Inspector Edward Catchpole. I love how he conducts independent questionings of some witnesses. Perhaps a slightly modern way of dealing with investigations,

I read this as a standalone in The New Hercule Poirot Mystery series, which worked perfectly just as all other stories I have read about Hercule Poirot. I love how the writing style is so excellently in keeping with the original Agatha Christie novels. An amusing vibe, in parts, does not get in the way of the seriousness of the murder investigation. In the centre of the story is the Devonport family who has an extreme capacity for denial. This might have been customary in the 1920s, so it adds an old fashioned feel to the story. Poirot allows Inspector Catchpool an independent, trusted position which might be a modern touch, but he still has to work with Poirot’s detailed lists. I feel this element adds information, clarifies and drives the plot forward in an amazing way.

My absolute favorite part of the story is Poirot’s interaction with amusing character Hester Semley. She is a feisty old lady who is insulted by Poirot’s tendency to interrupt her to dig out more details for the investigation.
I am not able to reveal my least favorite part of the story to avoid spoiler. Lets just say it relates to the second murder.

Fans of Agatha Christie will love this new mystery. As will readers of cozy mysteries.
Similar author to explore might be Agatha Christie.
Thank you to Kristiansand Public Library @krsbib for lending me this book. It gave me the opportunity to share my honest review and all opinions are completely my own.

Conclusion: This is the exiting new story where Hercule Poirot solves two complex murders helped by his interesting colleague, Scotland Yard Inspector, Edward Catchpool. They have to deal with a family with extraordinary capacity for denial living in an enclosed country estate. This is the perfect addition to the library of Agatha Christie books for fans old and new. I will be eagerly awaiting Sophie Hannah’s next release.

Rating: 5 stars / 5
Main reasons: interesting and complex plot, fabulous writing, great character building.

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When Richard Brockwell arrives in Ivy Hill for a Christmas visit, he is unprepared to meet childhood friend Arabella Awdry . She is familiar with his reputation as a rake and a libertine and she avoids him like the plague, while he keeps staying away from all eligible ladies.

An Ivy Hill Christmas is the Christmas historical romance novella by Julie Klassen, published by Bethany House Publishers. The story is set in fictional village Ivy Hill 1822 and we follow younger son Richard Brockwell as he comes to spend Christmas with his family. His mother wants to cut him off financially if he doesn’t make an effort to find a suitable lady to marry. Richard tries to scare off every eligible lady and continue his care-free life in London. His childhood friend Arabella Awdry also has no plans to marry and wants to spend her time doing charity work in London. They come to have a nice and relaxing time together, but Arabella is convinced Richard cannot be trusted.

Main character is budding, yet unpublished author, Richard Brockwell who seems a seriously shallow and uncharitable man with a bad reputation in London. I loved to follow his journey as he stayed with family and friends in Ivy Hill.

Supporting character is bluestocking philanthropist, Arabella Awdry. She is a strong and independent lady who is seriously unimpressed by Richard’s behavior around women; but has a secret wish for love and happiness. I liked her multilayered character a lot and she is my favorite of this story.

This sweet story was such a pleasure to read. It gave me all the Christmassy feels with the decorating, carol singing and church going. Even the rare occasion of snow. I loved how the beautiful book cover also set the tone of what to expect.

As always I loved Julie Klassen’s signature writing and the light and amusing dialogue. I particularly enjoyed the mystery element to do with a secret from Richard’ past.
My favorite part of the story was descriptions of church on Christmas Day. The part I found less enjoyable was descriptions of how a printer’s apprentice was treated. But I felt it made an excellent dramatic element.

When Richard scared Arabella off and she made her lack of interest in him blathantly clear, they both relaxed more which made room for feelings to grow. Richard seemed to go through a substantial change from his self serving life and become more aware of people around him.

This story is recommended for anyone who enjoys historical romance fiction and for fans of Julie Klassen. Similar authors to explore might be Kristi Ann Hunter or Erica Vetsch.

Thank you to publisher House Publishers and NetGalley for this eARC, which gave me the opportunity to share my honest review. All opinions expressed are completely my own.

Conclusion: This is the entertaining Christmas novella about confirmed bachelor Richard Brockwell who pretends to be a rake and Arabella Awdry who pretends to be a spinster. A satisfying Christmas add-on to the Tales from Ivy Hill series and the perfect read on a quiet afternoon in front of the fire or while on a break from Christmas preparations.

Rating: 5 stars / 5
Main reasons: entertaining Christmassy plot, great characters old and new, signature writing, enjoyable mystery element

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When French aristocrat Dacia de Prideaux escapes Paris and her brother’s murderer by the skin of her teeth, she has to hide as a maid in wealthy British landowner Mr. Richard Harris’ household. Dacia feels safe for a while, but Richard’s privileged lifestyle soon puts her life in danger and she has to flee again.

Revolution of Hearts is the standalone by Rhonda Gibb Hinrichsen, set in Paris 1789 at the start of the French Revolution. Aristocrat Dacia de Prideaux’s brother is murdered by a corrupt police officer. As Dacia was present when the murder happened, influential friends protect her from being the next victim by getting her boat passage to England. Aware she has fled Paris; wealthy landowner Mr. Richard Harris hires her as a maid in his household. He is impressed by her attitude and work ethics while she is trying to maneuver her new life below stairs. Richard goes about the ordinary lifestyle of the privileged not knowing it puts Dacia’s life in danger. Soon she is on the run again.

Main character is French aristocrat Dacia de Prideaux, aka Louise Bertrand, seems amazingly adaptable. I thoroughly enjoyed following her impressive personal development through the story as she has to learn a completely new mindset, speech and ways to tackle her new life as a maid. She is my absolute favorite of this story.

Supporting character is wealthy landowner Mr. Richard Harris who seems caring and kind to people high and low having been influenced by his late mother. I found him a likable character with his very own secrets.

My favorite part of the story was the descriptions of life in Mr Harris’ household which reminded me of Downton Abbey with an added twist of drama and danger towards the end. My least favorite part was description of Dacia’s brother’s murder and corrupt police blaming her for the murder and chasing her through Paris.

Both Dacia and Richard guard their secrets like life depends on it. Feelings start to sneak up on them as Richard asks Dacia to help him with an “in-house project”. I found this a thoroughly amusing and entertaining part of the book which made it feel real that a romantic relationship would develop between them.

Readers who enjoy stories with historical settings mixed with intense drama and romance would find A Revolution of Hearts a captivating tale. I would have loved to see a movie based on this story. Similar authors to explore might be Sarah M. Eden or Sarah E. Ladd.

Thank you to publisher Covenant Communications and NetGalley for this eARC which gave me the opportunity to share my honest review. All opinions expressed are completely my own.

Conclusion: This thrilling story is about the French aristocrat who has to flee Paris following her brother’s murder and hide as a maid in a wealthy English gentleman’s household. It offers a thoroughly captivating vibe fit for a movie, and a surprising twist towards the end. I am totally impressed by this new to me author and will definitely be on the look-out for Rhonda Gibb Hinrichsen’s next release.

Rating: 5 stars / 5
Main reasons: great entertaining plot, engaging characters.

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When squire’s daughter Margaret Honeywell’s father dies, her abusive neighbor and prospective husband Fredrick Burton-Smythe gets total control of her. He has challenged a stranger to a duel and Margret finds he looks the spitting image of her childhood friend. Events spiral into a race of jealousy and revenge, where Margaret is stuck in the middle.

Getleman Jim is the standalone regency romance by Mimi Matthews set in Somerset 1817 about squire’s daughter Margaret Honeywell who has been left in control of her abusive guardian and neighbor Frederick Burton-Smythe. Through his will, her father forces her to marry Fred and have the estates joined or she will lose all her assets. But Margaret has her heart set on illegitimate son and estate groom Nicholas Seaton, who went in search for his father years ago and never returned.

When Margaret tries to prevent Fred from dueling, she is shocked to meet John Beresford, Viscount St. Clare, who looks just like Nicholas but denies having met him. Fred picks up on a connection between the two and becomes even more bullying and controlling towards Margaret. She finds herself stuck between the two men trying to prevent them from hurting each other.

Main character John Beresford, Viscount St. Clare, has a secret history having grown up in Europe. I feel for him as the plot progresses and he is not able to tell Margaret the truth.

Secondary character squire’s daughter Margaret Honeywell was verbally assertive but suffered health challenges following her father’s death. Descriptions of her health I felt made her character come alive and be relatable. She is my favorite character of this story.

I felt this plot included some unique elements. The terrible lack of judgment and next level cynicism in the will added excellent dramatic effect. I particularly felt surprised and relieved by how Margaret’s closest friend Jane acted reminiscent to her lawyer in the early parts of the story. She certainly needed one as the plot progressed. The writing was captivating with thoroughly engaging dialogue and great character building. All this made me fly through the pages and wish for more.

The best part of this story was when Margaret tried to stop Fred’s duel by visiting his opponent. This serious surprise became the center of the plot. The effects of the will were by far the worst part.

The heart wrenching feelings between St. Clare and Margaret I felt were particularly well written. St. Clare offered Margaret 3 forfeits which I felt gave the story an element of fairy tale I’m sure would appeal to younger readers.

This unique story with several fresh elements would captivate readers of regency romance and fans of Mimi Matthews. Similar authors might be Michelle Griep or Erica Vetsch.

Thank you to publisher Perfectly Proper Press and for this eARC which gave me the opportunity to share my honest review. All opinions in this review are completely my own.

Conclusion: this unique regency romance includes captivating drama, legal issues, mystery and romance as St. Clare and Margaret tackle difficulties of secrecy, jealousy and revenge.

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When former celebrity adventuress Beryl Helliwell and local budding novelist Edwina Davenport are hired to investigate a series of burglaries, one with implications of national importance, they find local magistrate’s home burgled and the man himself dead at the bottom of the grand staircase.

Murder Comes to Call is installment 4 out of 4 in A Beryl and Edwina Mystery series by Jessica Ellicott. The story is set in post WW1 English village Walmsley Parva where inquiry agents Beryl and Edwina are hired to investigate the theft of village census reports when they find the local magistrate dead in his home. Under cover of working on the census case, Beryl and Edwina take it upon themselves to investigate all cases of criminal activity in the village. They suspect all are somehow connected and do not shy away from using slightly unorthodox sleuthing methods to find the culprits.

Main character former celebrity adventuress Beryl Helliwell tends to make somewhat rash decisions. She is a people person and relies on her glamorous and charming appearance to get her out of trouble whenever she colors a bit outside the lines. I find her an amusing character who is my favorite of the story.

Second main character is solicitor’s daughter Edwina Davenport who tries to keep secret that she writes a book in-between investigating cases. She is very concerned with her reputation, but I like her reserved and very proper personality. She seems a very good sleuth which makes me wish she would have better self-confidence.

I read it as a standalone and a first by this author, but I found the main characters so well crafted and relatable, I could have wished them to be my friends in real life. I was drawn in by the amusing parts describing Beryl and Edwina’s thought process as they were investigating. It highlighted their unique strengths and friendship which altogether seems to make them such a strong team. These elements I find make this story memorable.

The writing and dialogue conveyed a slightly old- fashioned vibe. The opulent English countryside setting felt reminiscent of Agatha Christie with a bit of Downton Abbey environments thrown in. The best part of this story was the amusing description of when Beryl and Edwina visited the village gossip lady to get information without revealing anything themselves.

Anyone who enjoys a well written historical cozy mystery set in post WW1 rural England would enjoy this story. As will fans of Jessica Ellicott. I am curious what comes next from this author, and will be on the look-out for any other releases from Jessica Ellicott. Similar authors to explore might be Alyssa Maxwell or Andrea Penrose.

Thank you to publisher Kensington Books and NetGalley for this eARC which gave me the opportunity to share my honest review. All opinions in this review are completely my own.

Conclusion: Murder Comes to Call is the captivating, charming and amusing cozy mystery about Beryl and Edwina as they solve murder and theft in post WW1 English countryside.
Rating: 4 stars / 5
Main reasons: charming plot, great writing, captivating character building

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Murder at Queens Landing is the 4th and final installment in the Wrexford and Sloan Mystery series by Andrea Penrose, published by Kensington Books. The story is set in the early nineteenth century London and we get to follow Alexander Wrexford and Charlotte Sloan as they investigate the murder of an East India Company clerk who has gotten too close to a secret web of financial crime within the company and gets murdered to cover it up. As Charlotte secretly makes satirical drawings exposing hypocrisy and injustice among the rich and powerful, her life is in danger if the culprits find out who she is.

Main character Earl Alexander Wrexford seems to have a volatile temper. I was pleased to follow his development from a self-sufficient brusque person not caring if he puts himself in danger, into a man with a heart for family and friends.

Supporting character earl’s daughter and satirical cartoonist Charlotte Sloan, is a widow who has chosen to distance herself from Society to make a living fighting against hypocrisy and injustice by publishing satirical drawings. I found her an impressive and interesting character of her time, working to carve out a new life, while still living by all the rules. She is my favorite of this story.

This is the first book I have read by Andrea Penrose. It included plenty of hints to events in other books in the series, which made me want to add them to my TBR. I found this story read perfectly as a standalone mystery where nothing was as it seemed. I loved the Dickensian vibe I got from the parts about street urchins and flower girls working to survive on the streets of London. I particularly enjoyed how Charlotte had a heart for street children and took care of two orphan brothers.
The plot included descriptions of mathematical and technical inventions I have not read about before; which fascinated me.
The writing felt light and easy with very entertaining dialogue. The parts where Charlotte and Alexander interacted were my particular favorites. Their relationship developed while they tried to be professional and became confused feelings had grown when they were not looking.

I felt a surprised and impressed by how Wrexford and Sloan found who was “at the top of the food chain” of this complicated scheme and managed to beat the criminals at their own game.
If you enjoy a great historical murder mystery with conspiracy and a twist of technical inventions thrown in, this would be just the thing for you. Similar authors to explore might be Anna Lee Huber or Clara McKenna.

Thank you to Kensington Books and NetGalley for the eARC which gave me the opportunity to share my honest review. All opinions in this review are completely my own.

Conclusion: This is the exiting and satisfying conclusion to the series where Wrexford and Sloan get to solve a murder meant to cover up financial crime within the East India Company where powerful and dangerous people are willing to do whatever it takes to build fortunes – including murder.
Rating: 4 stars / 5
Main reasons: engaging and entertaining plot, satisfying conclusion to series, enjoyable dialogue.

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When ex British intelligence agent Verity Kent is summoned by her aunt to figure out what’s going on at the family estate, she finds artwork forged and valuable heirlooms stolen among a number of strange happenings with links to a bigger, much more sinister, problem. As Verity gets closer to the truth, she finds herself in a life threatening situation.

A Pretty Deceit is the final installment in the 4 book historical crime fiction series Verity Kent Mysteries by Anna Lee Huber, published by Kensington Books. The story is set in Wiltshire, England 1919. We follow ex British Secret Service agent Verity Kent as she is summoned by her aunt to figure out a number of strange happenings after the estate has been used by the RAF during the war. Investigating, Verity finds connections to a neighboring airfield as well as links to some very powerful and dangerous people trying to cover up their criminal acts, lead by dangerous Lord Ardmore. As Verity gets close to the truth, she barely survives an attempt on her life.

Main character ex British Secret Service agent Verity Kent understandably seems a bit sensitive about her gender in the 1900s man’s world. I can really relate to her character as she compassionately reflects on hardships in her own life to understand struggles of others. This makes her my favorite character of this story.

Supporting character ex Secret Service agent Sidney Kent is Verity’s husband who seems slightly jealous and over protective as I would envision a man of post WW1 England. I still find him a very sympathetic and kind man of his time who keeps Verity sane in all the danger she gets herself into.

This is the first I have read by this author. The writing was excellent and I found it very enjoyable how the plot flowed slightly differently from others I have read. I thoroughly enjoyed reading about British intelligence activity during and after WW1, and will certainly follow up with more of Anna Lee Huber’s books or similar reads in future.
The plot worked well as a standalone. Plenty of hints to previous books, but if possible I would probably suggest reading the series in order to pick up on any details.

My favorite part of the story was descriptions of Verity’s birthday night of dinner and dancing at The Savoy with all its glitter and glamour. The worst was when Verity was attacked by an intruder who put strain on her neck and throat to get to crucial coded information Verity had just deciphered.

Fans of Anna Lee Huber would love this story and readers of murder mysteries would enjoy it too. Similar authors to explore might be Andrea Penrose or Dianne Freeman
Thank you to Kensington Books and NetGalley for this eARC which gave me the opportunity to share my honest review: All opinions in this review are completely my own.

Conclusion: If you enjoy a thrilling historical murder-mystery including post WW1 spies and traitors to The Crown, bodies turning up on a Downton Abbey inspired estate and an element of newlywed romance, this would be the one to read.

Rating: 4 stars / 5
Main reasons: plot was well crafted and surprising, relatable characters

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On her quest to find out who is stealing jewelry from the richest in New York City, journalist Genevieve Stewart is saved from a dangerous situation by millionaire Daniel McCaffrey who she suspects is the jewelry thief Robin Hood. When murders start happening, Genevieve and Daniel have to use their unique talents and contacts to find who the criminal is.

Deception by Gaslight is the exiting first installment in the new series A Gilded Gotham Mystery written by Kate Belli, published by Crooked Lane Books. The story is set in New York City 1888 where we follow journalist Genevieve Stewart. She works on getting information about famous jewel thief Robin Hood who is targeting the very richest. In her struggle to get information she sets her life in danger, and millionaire Daniel McCaffrey saves her. Genevieve is shocked to meet him again at an Astor 400 ball, and realizes he is not the street thug she thought but she suspects him of being Robin Hood. Jewelry keeps being stolen, and soon murders start happening too. Genevieve and Daniel use their unique contacts and talents to dig up information and as they come closer to the truth, danger to Genevieve’s life increases.

Main character Journalist Genevieve Stewart has suffered a great loss in her life, but is determined to work for a living. She seems a caring woman who treats people well and is a person who anyone would be proud to have as a friend. She is my absolute favorite of this story.

Supporting character millionaire and philanthropist Daniel McCaffrey comes from a humble background. He has learned to live between two worlds and makes this work in his philanthropic work. I found him an interesting character who sometimes struggles with his identity.
The characters felt like they could have been my friends in real life as they felt so well crafted and relatable.

This story was beautifully written and reminded me of Sarah M. Eden’s writing. The plot felt different as it contained an enjoyable and exiting collection of elements starting off with the mystery of Robin Hood’s identity. It had me turning pages into the wee hours of the night to get answers, and I was thoroughly surprised who Robin Hood turned out to be.

My favorite part of the story was the amusing way the relationship between Genevieve and Daniel developed. Starting with mutual distrust, they came to trust each other explicitly and rely on each other’s help as the story progressed. Least favorite part was when Genevieve found herself in a dangerous part of Town not able to escape threatening men.

Thank you to publisher Crooked Lane Books and NetGalley for this eARC which gave me the opportunity to share my honest review. All opinions are completely my own.

Conclusion: Deception by Gaslight is the exiting start of the very promising new series which will captivate readers of cozy mysteries. It contains a collection of well crafted mystery elements and relatable characters that will stay in your memory for a long time.
I eagerly await the next installment in the series or any other release from this author. Similar authors to explore might be Dianne Freeman or Andrea Penrose.

Rating: 5 stars / 5
Main reason: interesting and entertaining plot, relatable characters, beautiful writing

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